rw.acetonemagazine.org
New recipes

Australian Company Donates Uneaten Airline Food

Australian Company Donates Uneaten Airline Food


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


OzHarvest Brisbane is working to solve the food waste problem by donating unused airline food to hungry Australians

Wikimedia Commons / Pat Guiney / CC BY 2.0

Behold, the most disrespected of all food forms.

In the public eye, airline food’s image has been poor for a while; something comedians have been joking about it for years. However, one Australian charity is out to change that.

OzHarvest Brisbane is a charity that brings unopened snacks and first-class meals to hungry Australians. The company then repurposes that food, donating it to more than 200 charities in the area. Since its founding in 2004, OzHarvest has reclaimed roughly 400 to 900 pounds of food each day.

OzHarvest presents a model for aspiring charities across the globe. The United States’ food waste problem is staggering: We throw out 50 percent of all food produced each year. Americans waste $160 billion in food annually, while 48 million Americans are food-insecure, according to Feeding America.

This massive problem cannot be solved by a couple of organizations single-handedly. Some groups have begun to address the issue in creative and helpful ways, such as the folks donating extra food from the Democratic National Convention to hungry Philadelphians.

However, it’s going to take millions of Americans saving food in simple ways for the food waste situation to improve. The Environmental Protection Agency recommends a few easy ways to reduce waste: plan before grocery shopping, store and freeze foods properly (so they don’t go bad), and use leftovers.


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."


Stop & Shop Converts Inedible Food Into Energy

Thanks to cutting-edge technology, 95 tons of food waste that can't be sold or donated is being converted to energy by Stop & Shop, a New England-based grocery chain. The waste is collected daily from all Stop & Shop locations that aren't on islands, and then processed at a new green facility using a method called anaerobic digestion.

Stop & Shop has worked on this facility for six or seven years, which helps the company attain its goal of being landfill-free by 2020. The facility saves this food from the landfill, and as of right now, Stop & Shop has achieved 88 percent of that goal.

Plus, Stop & Shop's effort runs parallel to a Connecticut goal to reduce its contribution of solid waste to landfills by 2024. A key to that goal is recycling organics through compost facilities and anaerobic digesters like Stop & Shop's new plant.

The facility, which opened April 15, generates 1.14 megawatts each day, roughly 40 percent of the energy required by the next-door distribution center. Plans to build additional facilities in Connecticut are underway.

Stop & Shop spokesperson Phil Tracey said that the facility was certainly a "significant investment" for the company. It was, nevertheless, an investment in the environment, he added, and "important in us getting to our goal [of being landfill-free]."