rw.acetonemagazine.org
New recipes

Digestive Cookies

Digestive Cookies



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Wheat germ, the nutrient-rich heart of wheat kernels, gives these cookies their hearty, nutty crunch while also keeping them tender and crumbly. The butter and milk can be substituted with plant-based alternatives without sacrifice, so make them vegan if you want.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1⅓ cups (167 g) whole wheat flour, plus more for surface
  • 2 oz. chocolate (any percentage), chopped (optional)
  • 1 tsp. refined coconut oil (optional)

Special Equipment

  • A 2”-diameter cookie cutter

Recipe Preparation

  • Place racks in upper and lower thirds of oven; preheat to 350°. Process 1⅓ cups whole wheat flour, wheat germ, sugar, baking powder, salt, and butter in a food processor until butter virtually disappears and you have a fine, floury meal. Add milk and pulse until a damp and crumbly dough forms.

  • Turn dough out onto an unfloured surface and gently knead just to bring it into a ball; flatten into a disk. Lightly flour surface and roll out dough until just shy of ¼” thick. Lightly flour cookie cutter and punch out cookies, dusting with more flour as needed to avoid sticking. Dust any excess flour off of cookies with a dry pastry brush.

  • Using a spatula, transfer cookies to 2 parchment-lined baking sheets. Gently knead scraps together, reroll, and punch out more cookies. Discard any scraps (or bake as is and crumble over ice cream!).

  • Prick each cookie 3 times with a fork and bake, rotating baking sheets top to bottom and front to back halfway through, until bottoms and edges are browned, 15–18 minutes. Let cool on baking sheets (cookies will crisp up as they cool).

  • If using, melt chocolate and oil in a microwave-safe bowl in the microwave in 20-second increments, stirring after each burst, until mostly melted and smooth, about 1 minute total. (Alternatively, melt in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water, stirring occasionally, until melted; do not let bowl touch water.) Stir chocolate mixture until fully melted, then continue to stir until slightly cooled and thickened, about 3 minutes. (This makes it easier to get a thick layer of chocolate on the cookies.)

  • Using a small offset spatula or butter knife and working one at a time, spread a scant 1 tsp. chocolate over the flat underside of each cookie. Using the edge of the spatula and starting from one side and working your way to the other, gently and quickly press a few lines into chocolate as desired. Chill cookies on baking sheets until chocolate is set, about 10 minutes.

  • Do ahead: Cookies can be made 3 weeks ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Recipe by Sohla El-WayllyReviews SectionYou are fantastic! I really have to thank you. I've been struggling the last few months after my mom, diagnosed with multiple myeloma and recently having suffered congestive heart failure, was put on a zero sodium diet. No packaged foods whatsoever. I adore my mom, so I decided that now would be the time to finally get around to learning my way around a kitchen, as I vowed that she would never feel deprived, because I'd work my booty off to replace the things she likes, or introduce her to new ones.She was devastated when she couldn't have digestives with her coffee anymore in the morning (sometimes when you're dealing with so much, the small things can be especially demoralizing.) I literally just pulled these out of the oven (after figuring out how to turn on the food processor, haha!) and the only change I made was that I didn't add any salt at all. These cookies came out perfectly, and despite my doubt, they taste exactly like regular digestive cookies! And they have the right texture too! She is going to be hella psyched tomorrow morning when she gets to have one of her old favourites again. Thank you so much - I'll definitely be coming back here for more recipes to try as I boldly go forward into (for me) the new kitchen frontier. ;) Thank you again!ElalaToronto, Canada07/24/20I've made these a couple times now. Delicious, crunchy and easy. I love that they can be made in no time at all since the dough doesn't need to be chilled. The dough can be a little sticky, but it's very forgiving and I've found I can be generous with the flour when rolling it out.This last time, I used up what I had left of some buckwheat flour ~ about 70 grams ~ and the rest whole wheat pastry. I loved the rustic color and flavor and will make that substitution going forward. Used toasted oats rather than wheat germ. I also used coarse sea salt and didn't find them too salty. I love making these for my little niece and nephew.These came out perfectly. I have been building a birthday basket of childhood treats for my mum and this was the best recipe for digestives I have found! I am out of wheat germ so I swapped for flax meal and still got a deliciously snappy biscuit. I also do not have cow milk and coconut worked fine. I love how bulletproof your recipes are, so well tested that even with swaps, we still get what we were looking for!AnonymousVirginia05/20/20I don’t know what I did wrong, but my dough was way too wet to cut. I put it in the fridge to see if the butter would firm it back up. If, not..this will be one big cracker that we break up to eat.These turned out great! They satisfied my digestive biscuit cravings :) I didn't have wheat germ or whole wheat flour so I used spelt flour to substitute. I also used almond milk. I found the dough to be very sticky to roll out (could have been a result of my substitutions but who knows). I think the kosher salt made the flavour well balanced. Will definitely make them again. Looking forward to enjoying them for the upcoming week.Brilliant recipe! I have been making Rick's Brown Butter Choc Chip Toffee cookies and they are my new fave. But sometimes you want just a plain biscuit to have with a cup of tea. So these digestives are my "go to" for that, even without the chocolate! Thanks so much for the inspiration!I was thwarted by my oven and by not paying attention at the store...I got stone ground wheat by mistake, so they are extra wheat-y and I forgot my oven runs hot, so a lot got burnt :( I subbed ground flax, plant butter and almond milk. So while I'm one of those that totally didn't follow the recipe, they are STILL quite tasty and I most def will make again!!This is one of the best cookie recipes I have yet to bake. Now, with COVID-19, I also had a couple swaps and freelancing. Used hazelnut meal for the wheatgerm. Added 1/4 cup chunky Adams peanut butter, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp vanilla, and 1/4 tsp of nutmeg. Oh my! Oh my!KimberlyDSeattle, WA05/09/20This recipe is definitely going on our family’s #SundaysAreForBaking rotation! Soooooo yummy! I made the following swap outs given my covid19 pantry situation: ground flaxseed for the wheat germ; used 2% milk (all we have); and avocado oil for the refined coconut oil in the chocolate “frosting”. I also halved the salt based on other reviews. Lastly, I opted to cut them out with a 1-inch cookie cutter (easier for my kiddo to eat) and baked them for 15mins. Made 60 bite-sized yummilicious treats! Thank you Sohla for this great, flexible recipe!!! ❤️❤️❤️Treena OngkingToronto, Ontario, Canada04/26/20I was very impressed with these cookies! I made several modificationsUsed toasted oats instead of wheat germUsed brown sugar rather than whiteI couldn't be bothered dipping in chocolate so I added a handful of dark chocolate buttons to the mix and pulsed in the processor to get a Chocolate-flecked appearance.These were so tasty, perfect for coffee, not too sweet and really did get better after a couple days. I thought they tasted too salty at first but they mellowed out once they had completely cooled.NatAttack89Australia04/17/20Easy to make and delicious!! Substituted wheat germ for toasted oats as others have noted previously, and they're fab.Thank you for this recipe! I have missed Digestive cookies and these did not disappoint. I substitute flax for wheat germ, vegan “butter” and Gluten free flour. Turned out just liked it should.AnonymousVictoria Canada 03/31/20Delicious but way too salty. Cut the salt at least in half.AnonymousBrooklyn, NY03/29/20Yaaaaas queen! We loved them! We made half the recipes because we also used ground flaxseed since it was all we had on hand and were not sure it would work.I got distracted and my dog ate the remaining dough so we had 3 cookies less lol But I guess it’s also a YES From my dog (she obviously didn’t eat the chocolate tho). Sohla is awesome.Great cookies and honestly they were super fast to make!Perfect with a cup of coffee.mathieuGeneva, Switzerland03/25/20Very tasty! I used wheat bran instead of wheat germ because we're social distancing and that's all I had, and they still worked. They turned out a bit salty - a weight measurement for the salt would be nice. Also, I wished there was a note about spacing the cookies on the sheet (they don't spread, but I wasn't sure until I baked them).These cookies are amazing!!! I didn't have wheat germ so I used ground flaxseed instead which is a popular substitute and they are fantastic. Digestives are some of my favourite cookies and I could never find a good recipe until now! I used more chocolate for a thicker layer of chocolate and found milk chocolate to be the best of the 3 types I used. Also, I would recommend chilling the dough for an hour before cutting them out to minimize the spread in order to get really crisp edges. I absolutely love Sohla, and her recipes are fantastic! I cannot wait to make these again!These were so amazing! Used toasted rolled oats like Sohla suggested in her insta-story, and it made for a very nice cookie. I love the texture, and not too sweet. Super easy, and definitely will be making this again!HubiruaeFrisco, TX03/24/20Sohla used Old Fashioned Rolled Oats on her instastory as a substitute. She toastEd them to give them a nutty flavor! Excited to try this recipe!Really excited to try this but I can’t find Wheat germ in grocery stores near me, is there a substitute I can use? Thanks!

How to make digestive biscuits

Digestive biscuits are one of the most popular biscuits ever – us Brits just can’t get enough of them!

They’re super-easy to make at home, too, so get the kettle on, roll up your sleeves and get baking.

This is what I like to call a “one-bowl-wonder” recipe, making it an ideal recipe for kids to get involved in. Better still, there are tons of different ways of rolling and cutting the dough – so if you have some creative little people with you, there are lots of options for biscuit design.

The recipe below comes from my first ever book Bee’s Brilliant Biscuits . Enjoy!


Digestive Biscuits with Raisins

This easy recipe is adapted from Gary Rhodes' recipe for digestive biscuits with few personal changes. I added a little more sugar as I wanted to be more sweet and I added raisins as they go perfect in this combination.

If made simple, with no raisins can be perfectly used as base for a cheesecake. In any case these crispy, sweet digestive biscuits are so good that I decided to make them constantly for my family. The oats bring their specific flavor and are very good with tea or coffee in the morning or for kids.

  • Makes about 17-18 biscuits
  • 1 cup (100 g) wholewheat flour
  • 1 cup (100 g) rolled oats
  • 4 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 3 tbsp raisins
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 stick butter (100 g) butter, at room temperature
  • 2 tbsp milk
  1. Put the oats in the bowl of a blender and run it 5 seconds to turn them into crumbs. Mix together all of the dry ingredients. Add butter and stir to form a breadcrumbs texture. Add milk to create a moist pastry consistency.Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the fridge.
  2. Preheat oven to 180 °C (350 F) and line one baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Dust the working surface with a little flour and roll out the dough to a thickness of 3 mm (the dough is not very easy to work with). Cut circles of 7-8 cm in diameter, re-rolling any trimmings. Place them on the prepared baking sheet.
  4. Bake for about 15-18 minutes until lightly brown.
  5. Let them cool on a wire rack. Keep them in an airtight container for up to 3-4 days.

As I know they are called digestive biscuits because they are made with whole wheat flour and rolled oats which makes them contain more fibers that are good for digestion. I personally like to add few tbsp of wheat bran also, which makes them even more digestive.

Just added the cup measurement too.. Let me know if you try it ..

I am trying to do this with all the recipes that doesn't have cup measurements. Hope I can finish this pretty soon. Happy Easter Kari.


A digestive biscuit, sometimes described as a sweet-meal biscuit, is a semi-sweet biscuitthat originated in Scotland, and is popular worldwide. The term “digestive” is derived from the belief that they had antacid properties due to the use of sodium bicarbonate when they were first developed.

A digestive biscuit typically consists of a minimum of 50 calories. They are the not a healthy choice if you are in a weight loss journey. Since it has butter and sugar added in them. But if you are looking for a healthier cookies then this cookies is good because it is made with whole wheat flour.


Nutrition in Digestive Biscuits

Digestive biscuits average approximately 84 calories each, though this will be higher or lower depending on the ingredients, the size and whether any chocolate is involved. Digestive biscuits which are made with whole-grain flour offer the most dietary fiber, according to a comparison study done by Consumer Affairs. The highest amount of dietary fiber found in a commercially mass-produced digestive biscuit was 7.1 percent. A high-fiber digestive biscuit may help you feel full longer than a cookie made with processed white flour and refined sugar. Fiber also plays a part in healthy elimination, and a high-fiber diet can help you avoid the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain types of cancer. If you're craving a mid-morning, afternoon or bedtime snack with a bit of crunch, have your digestive biscuit with a piece of fruit to raise your snack's nutrition content.


Digestives biscuits are a classic British recipe, perfect to dunk into afternoon tea. They were first made to aid digestion as they contain baking soda which neutralises acids, hence the name.

Most brands you find in store at your local store contain unnecessary saturated fats, mostly from butter and palm oil, and refined white sugar. We will instead show you how to make an healthier variation that will give us vegan, dairy-free, sugar-free and gluten-free digestive biscuits. A lot of "free" right? Our recipe is remarkably diet-friendly!

How did we do this? Our biscuits are prepared with rolled oat, nuts, and fruit, all nutritious ingredients which provide lots of fibres, healthy unsaturated fats, vitamins, and minerals.

Used a homemade gluten-free flour, made from ground rolled oat and mixed nuts.

Replaced white sugar with applesauce which is made from cooked apple and is naturally sweet.

Replaced eggs with Flaxseeds (flax-egg), which are a good source of omega-3 and help make the recipe vegan.

That&aposs it! Follow our simple steps below and you will crunching these goodies in no time. Once cooked, you can store them in an airtight container for up to 3 days.


Commonly asked questions

When can I eat digestive biscuits?

Digestives can be eaten as a snack anytime and are most commonly consumed with a cup of tea, coffee, or hot chocolate. Brits commonly dunk them into a hot beverage to soften their texture.

What can I make with digestive biscuits?

Digestive biscuits are delicious eaten on their own, but they can also be ground into a crumb and used as a pie crust or a base for cheesecake. They also soften nicely when combined with cream and liqueurs and can be added in chunks to trifles.

How do I store digestive biscuits?

To keep digestives fresh, store them in an airtight container in the pantry or any cool, dry area. The sugar content keeps them from going off – they will usually last several weeks through to several months before the texture starts to degrade.


Chocolate Digestive Biscuits

1. Place the flour, oatmeal, salt and bicarb into a large mixing bowl, stir and rub in the butter until it looks a bit like bread crumbs.

2. Stir in the sugar then add the milk and bring the mixture together, squeezing and kneading in the bowl to form a dough.

3. Flatten into a disc, wrap in cling film and place in the fridge for 30 minutes.

4. Line two baking trays with baking parchment. Place the dough between 2 sheets of parchment paper and roll the dough to 3mm thick.

5. Using a 6.5cm straight sided cutter stamp out circles. Place on the prepared trays leaving spaces between. Prick the surface of the biscuits with a skewer or fork and place in the fridge for 20 minutes.

6. Preheat your oven to 190°C/170°C fan/Gas Mark 5. Take the chilled biscuits from the fridge and bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until golden and crisp. Leave to cool on the tray for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

7. Break the chocolate into small chunks and place in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Once the chocolate has melted remove from the heat. Dip a teaspoon in the melted chocolate and place it on top of one biscuit.

8. Working from the middle to the edge spread the chocolate so the surface is thinly coated. Using a skewer, draw lines across the chocolate horizontally and then vertically to create a pattern on the surface of the chocolate.

9. Repeat on the other biscuits until the melted chocolate is used up. Leave the biscuits until the chocolate has set.


Chocolate Digestive Biscuits

1. Place the flour, oatmeal, salt and bicarb into a large mixing bowl, stir and rub in the butter until it looks a bit like bread crumbs.

2. Stir in the sugar then add the milk and bring the mixture together, squeezing and kneading in the bowl to form a dough.

3. Flatten into a disc, wrap in cling film and place in the fridge for 30 minutes.

4. Line two baking trays with baking parchment. Place the dough between 2 sheets of parchment paper and roll the dough to 3mm thick.

5. Using a 6.5cm straight sided cutter stamp out circles. Place on the prepared trays leaving spaces between. Prick the surface of the biscuits with a skewer or fork and place in the fridge for 20 minutes.

6. Preheat your oven to 190°C/170°C fan/Gas Mark 5. Take the chilled biscuits from the fridge and bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until golden and crisp. Leave to cool on the tray for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

7. Break the chocolate into small chunks and place in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water. Once the chocolate has melted remove from the heat. Dip a teaspoon in the melted chocolate and place it on top of one biscuit.

8. Working from the middle to the edge spread the chocolate so the surface is thinly coated. Using a skewer, draw lines across the chocolate horizontally and then vertically to create a pattern on the surface of the chocolate.

9. Repeat on the other biscuits until the melted chocolate is used up. Leave the biscuits until the chocolate has set.


Directions [ edit | edit source ]

Combine the dry ingredients, and then cut in the butter so that the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
Combine the water and vanilla and drizzle over the dry mixture.
Blend until the dough can be packed together.
Roll out on a floured surface or between two sheets of waxed paper until the dough is about 3 mm (1/8 inch) thick.
Cut into circles or other shapes and bake on a greased baking sheet at 170 °C/ 325 °F/ Gas Mark 3 for 20 to 25 minutes make sure the oven does not get too hot- they should not be too brown.
Cool and store in an airtight container at room temperature.