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The Only Roast Chicken Recipes You'll Ever Need

The Only Roast Chicken Recipes You'll Ever Need


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Roast chicken is one of the simplest, most versatile dishes out there, but there are many ways to dress it up

Rachael Pack

Oven-roasting a chicken requires as few as two ingredients: salt and of course the bird itself. Once the bird is seasoned, just put it into a hot oven; the skin will turn golden brown and crisp as the tender meat cooks. That’s it; that’s really all it takes.

But shall I go on? Fine, if you insist.

Chicken is one of the most versatile meats in the world, and roast chicken in particular is one of the most versatile dishes. It can be seasoned any way your palate desires; all that matters is that the basic technique stays the same.

The Only Roast Chicken Recipes You'll Ever Need

Rachael Pack

Oven-roasting a chicken requires as few as two ingredients: salt and of course the bird itself. It can be seasoned any way your palate desires; all that matters is that the basic technique stays the same.

Antonio’s Roast Chicken

This dish is just a simply seasoned roast chicken, but it stands out in the way in which the oven temperature in adjusted throughout the cooking process to create irresistibly crispy skin: “Put the chicken in the oven and blast it at that high heat for 40 minutes. You might think you’re going to burn it. Don’t worry. You won’t. No need to open the oven to check. You don’t want to lose that heat. After 40 minutes, turn the temperature down to 175 degrees F and leave the chicken in there for another 40 minutes.” Click here for the recipe.

Fennel, Lemon, and Crushed Black Pepper Roasted Chicken

Rachael Pack

Big flakes of freshly cracked black pepper, charred lemon, and sweet fennel lend big flavor to an otherwise simple dish. Click here for the recipe.

Greek-Style Roasted Chicken and Potatoes

This roasted chicken calls for the classic Greek flavor combination of garlic, oregano, and lemon. For this recipe, click here.

Lemon Curd and Black Pepper Roasted Chicken

Black pepper and coriander are stirred into a savory lemon curd and then brushed under and on the chicken’s skin. The result: citrusy and tender meat with crackling chicken skin. For this recipe, click here.

Lemon Butter Roasted Chicken Thighs

Lemongrass and Turmeric Chicken

The turmeric is responsible for the gorgeous color here. The flavor is earthy and slightly bitter but is contrasted by the delicious flavors of sweet dates and lemongrass. For this recipe, click here.

Pot-Roasted Chicken

This roast chicken is cooked in a heavy Dutch oven. Piney rosemary, sweet celery root, salty-rich slab bacon, crushed juniper berries, and calvados infuse this chicken with crazy good flavor. Check out this recipe here.

Roasted Chicken Drumsticks

If you’re a fan of drumsticks, this roast chicken is for you. The drumsticks are tossed in coconut oil, chopped rosemary, chopped fresh thyme, and salt and roasted in the oven. Check out this recipe here.

Roasted Chicken and Tomatoes

Dark meat stays deliciously moist and is difficult to overcook — and it's more budget-friendly. For this recipe, click here.

Roasted Chicken With Bacon-Glazed Brussels Sprouts and Caramelized Onions

The key to this chicken is a technique called “spatchcocking.” Using scissors, you remove the backbone and flatten the chicken with your hand, breaking the rib cage, so the chicken lies flat. This technique speeds up the cooking time and helps the breast and legs to cook more evenly. Click here for the recipe.

Slow-Cooker Roast Chicken

Lauren Gordon

For when you don’t want to spend time fretting over the oven, place your chicken in the slow-cooker. You’ll still get that wonderfully homey roast chicken, but with far less effort. Find the recipe here.

Skillet-Roasted Chicken Breasts With Lavender and Red Wine-Butter Sauce

This beautiful dish has a decidedly feminine flair, complete with a silky pink sauce and a flower garnish. “But don’t let that prevent you from serving these chicken breasts to the manliest of men,” writes Jill Silverman Hough. “It’s amazingly seductive.” Click here for the recipe.

Tarragon-Roasted Chicken

What makes this dish special is the combination of sage, rosemary, lemon, and tarragon stuffed into the bird’s cavity. It smells divine when roasting, and the meat acquires a lush citrus-herb flavor. For this recipe, click here.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.


All you need is a roasting pan (or a rimmed baking sheet in a pinch) and an instant-read meat thermometer. Setting a roasting rack into the pan is optional but will help the chicken cook more evenly, since air can circulate freely under the chicken. With a roasting rack, the chicken won&apost be resting in its own drippings, which will give you crispier skin. For easier cleanup, you can line the pan with aluminum foil.

You can also spatchcock (aka butterfly) your chicken, or remove the backbone and flatten it out before roasting on a flat rack in a roasting pan or rimmed baking sheet. A spatchcocked chicken roasts more quickly and evenly and results in lots of crispy skin. Read more about how to spatchcock and roast the juiciest chicken ever.