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"Carawe" - The dessert of the lehusa



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In the Arab world, the arrival of a child is an occasion of celebration that involves certain ceremonies.
In Jordan and Palestine, Lehuza visitors are served with cinnamon-boiled tea and sprinkled with crushed walnuts or caraway: a pudding made from ground rice and sweet cumin (fennel).
Popular wisdom holds that fennel stimulates the secretion of milk in the udders.

  • 4 glasses of water
  • 1 glass of ground rice (powder)
  • 2 glasses of sugar
  • 2 tablespoons ground sweet cumin (carawe in Arabic or caraway in English) known in Romania as fennel
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • almonds, pistachios, crushed walnuts, pine seeds (snobar -l.araba) for decoration

Servings: 6

Preparation time: less than 30 minutes

PREPARATION RECIPE "Carawe" - Dessert of lehusa:

In a non-stick pan put the water with the sugar to boil; when it starts to boil, add the ground rice and mix well so that no lumps form.

Add the sweet cumin and cinnamon and cook for 8-10 minutes until thickened.

Put the resulting pudding in dessert cups and decorate to taste with almond seeds, walnuts, pistachios or snobs.

I have a manual nut crusher.


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15 Best Beers To Drink This Winter

It’s hardly been 10 minutes since you finished your last pumpkin beer of the season and already people are busting out the tinsel and lawn decorations. As you slide from the dark, spicy beers of fall into the… even darker, spicier beers of winter, I have a few recommendations you should consider grabbing on the way back from buying your inflatable Rudolph.

Oscar Blues Ten FIDY

Imperial Stout, 10.5%
Longmont, CO

When the temperature drops and the sun starts setting at 4pm, sometimes the best thing you can do is reach for a full-bodied, high-ABV comfort beer like Ten FIDY. It’s packed with roasted coffee and dark chocolate flavors while still boasting an uncharacteristically hoppy backbone (98 IBUs), which is everything a winter-weary soul needs. The only thing that’s better than the can is finding it on nitro draft.

21st Amendment Fireside Chat

Winter Warmer, 7.9%
San Francisco, CA

This is the short-sleeved sweater of winter beers: full-bodied enough to warm you up, but not so over the top that you’ll be sweating after one. It has hints of cinnamon, coffee, and chocolate with an ample malt backbone and a lingering aftertaste that will have you swearing you just took a bite of fruitcake and Christmas cookies.

Sierra Nevada Celebration

American IPA, 6.8%
Chico, CA.

Leave it to the consummate pros at Sierra Nevada to create what’s arguably the most crowd-pleasing winter seasonal on the market. They’ve traded out cinnamon and cloves for good old-fashioned American hops. The resinous aromas of the hop-forward recipe will have you convinced there’s a freshly chopped Christmas tree in the room with a nicely wrapped Sega CD console underneath.

Southern Tier 2XMAS

“Double Spiced Ale”, 8%
Lakewood, NY

Ever the innovators when it comes to seasonal offerings, the team at Southern Tier based 2XMAS off of a traditional gl & oumlgg recipe, which is a warm, boozy Swedish holiday beverage (think mulled wine mixed with a bunch of booze). They’ve brewed this one up with cardamom, figs, orange peels, cloves, and ginger root, all refreshingly balanced with a subtle spice that carries through nicely on the dry finish. It’s cozier than a cashmere Snuggie!

Bell’s Winter White Ale

Witbier, 5%
Kalamazoo, MI

If you need a break from the glut of dark seasonal beers, Bell’s has a solid answer with their Winter White Ale. The subtle clove, orange peel, and banana notes from the Belgian yeast and its dry finish make it familiar but refreshing in a dark sea of ​​winter warmers. The seasonally low 5% ABV makes it a more sessionable option for holiday parties.

Pretty Things Babayaga

Stout, 7%
Somerville, MA

At first blush, it may seem like Massachusetts ’best gypsy brewers are just putting out a par-for-the-course winter stout, but they really aren’t messing around here: they smoked the malt with rosemary to highlight the dark espresso flavors and used a blend of Belgian and English yeast strains. The velvety mouthfeel and smoky finish make it a knockout comfort beer that pairs equally well with burgers as it does chocolate desserts.

Founders Backwoods Bastard

Scotch Ale, 10.2%
Grand Rapids, MI

If you’re a fan of an after-dinner Scotch, get excited for this one. Though American breweries tend to flounder when making Scotch Ales, this one is a true palate kicker with rich, roasted maltiness, oak, and a subtle hint of smoke. It pairs perfectly with stick-to-your-ribs meals, like pot roast or beef stew. Sip it slowly and enjoy the complexity.

Jolly Pumpkin Pumpkin Christmas

Belgian Strong Ale, 9%
Dexter, MI

Tart, sour cherries, oak, and bourbon notes come together with subtle funky, earthy notes to make this a standout for anyone looking to depart from the standard glut of dark, spicy beers. This beer is practically begging to be paired with roasted duck. DON’T LET IT DOWN.

Maine Lil ’One

American Strong Ale, 9.1%
Freeport, ME

The brewers themselves even admit that this could be classified as either “a malty double IPA” or a “hoppy barley wine”, but the ambiguity doesn’t make it any less delicious. The fruity aromas give way to hoppy, caramel flavors that make for a truly unique beer from one of the best breweries in the Northeast.

Lagunitas Sucks

7.85%
Petaluma, CA Chicago, IL

Sucks is proof that the laid-back Lagunitas crew isn’t above self-deprecation: they developed this beer when they found out they wouldn’t be able to brew enough of their popular Brown Shugga to meet demand. Bright hops and the various grains (barley, wheat, rye, and oats) make for a rare medium-bodied seasonal that’s bright and citrusy.

God of the Sky Winter Solstice

Barley Wine, 10.2%
St-J & eacuter & ocircme, Quebec, Canada

It finally feels as though barley wines are moving away from being niche, and fantastic breweries like Dieu du Ciel are part of the reason why. This rich, fruity beer has a thick mouthfeel and intense roasted caramel flavors that are balanced out by a dark, bitter finish.

Ayinger Celebrator

Doppelbock, 6.7%
Aying, Germany

Think of this as your late winter history lesson for your friends: doppelbocks were developed by monks in Germany who weren’t allowed to eat solid food for the entirety of Lent. To sustain themselves, they created this malty, rich, bready, sometimes plummy style. Paulaner is credited with the original batches, but Ayinger’s is simply the most complex representation of the style today. Plus, each of the bottles comes with a little goat necklace!

Anchor Christmas Ale 2014

5.5%
San Francisco, CA
Even though everything about Anchor’s Christmas Ale changes every year - from the recipe down to the label - I’ve yet to have one that disappoints. Popping the first one of the season is a little bit like being a kid opening a present on Christmas morning: even though the recipe is a secret, you can expect a festive, slightly spicy winter warmer that is less jarring to the palate than other beers in this style.

DuPont With Greetings

Abbey Tripel, 9.5%
Tourpes, Leuze-en-Hainaut, Belgium

Originally brewed in very small batches as a gift for loyal customers, “With best wishes” has become a staple for beer geeks come wintertime. It’s a gloriously rich, fruit-forward, spicy, balanced beer. Bottle fermentation adds complexity, but also makes it age-worthy, so you can sit on it until next winter (if you can resist the temptation).

Hitachino Nest Commemorative Ale

Eisbock, 9%
Naka, Ikabari Prefecture, Japan

Eisbocks are already a very full-bodied style, thanks to their definitive process where water is removed by freezing and concentrating the beer. This rich, flavorful seasonal takes the full-bodied Eisbock style even further, by brewing with five different grains, four types of hops, cinnamon, vanilla beans, orange peel, coriander, and nutmeg.


Carawe - Lehuzei Dessert - Recipes

by ConfederateSS on Thu Jun 08, 2017 10:37 am


ConfederateSS Posts: 1984 Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:50 pm Location: THE CONFEDERATE STATES of AMERICA and THE OLD WEST! 2

Re: The Great War

by Dukasaur on Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:23 pm

Trentino is listed in the list of Current and Upcoming Tournaments:


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Re: The Great War

by Kevi on Fri Jun 09, 2017 5:39 am


Kevi Posts: 348 Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2015 10:51 am Location: On a desert island

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:39 am

Dukasaur wrote: So, we’re now almost a full year behind. A lot of the tournament writers that were helping in the beginning have dropped out, and I just can't keep up with it. Here's a list of tournaments that should have launched in the last eleven months but didn't because I couldn't keep up with writing them. If anyone wants to take a stab at any of them, that would be great. Don't worry that you don't know how to code the autotournaments I can take care of that. I just need the composition.

  • Asiago & # 40battle fought 15th of May, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 15th of May, 2016 & # 41
  • Trentino & # 40battle fought 15th of May, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 15th of May, 2016 & # 41
  • Jutland & # 40battle fought 31st of May, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 31st of May, 2016 & # 41
  • Lutsk & # 40battle fought 4th of June, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 4th of June, 2016 & # 41 see my post below
  • Khanaquin & # 40battle fought 4th of June, 1916, therefore the corresponding )
  • First Day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916 see my post below
  • Bazentin Ridge, July 14th, 1916
  • Delville Wood, July 15th, 1916
  • Battle of Pozières, July 23rd, 1916
  • Romani, August 3rd, 1916
  • Sixth Battle of the Isonzo, August 6th, 1916
  • Gorizia, August 6th, 1916
  • Battle of Guillemont, Sept 3rd
  • Seventh Battle of the Isonzo, Sept 14th
  • Battle of Flers-Courcelette, Sept 15th
  • Eighth Isonzo, October 8th, 1916
  • Ninth Isonzo, November 1st
  • Maghdaba, December 14th
  • Second Kut, Dec. 15th
  • Opening 1917, the small but exciting Battle of Khadairi Bend, January 9th, 1917
  • Battle of Nahr-al-Kalek, February 26th, 1917
  • Fall of Baghdad, March 11th, 1917
  • Samarrah, March 13th
  • Fallujah, March 19th
  • Jebel Hamrin, March 25
  • First Gaza, March 26h

I've crossed out the ones I've seen started recently. Am I correct in the updated list? Has anyone done something for Lutsk? I'm going to give it a try. I think.


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by Dukasaur on Thu Jun 15, 2017 3:07 pm

Dukasaur wrote: So, we’re now almost a full year behind. A lot of the tournament writers that were helping in the beginning have dropped out, and I just can't keep up with it. Here's a list of tournaments that should have launched in the last eleven months but didn't because I couldn't keep up with writing them. If anyone wants to take a stab at any of them, that would be great. Don't worry that you don't know how to code the autotournaments I can take care of that. I just need the composition.

  • Asiago & # 40battle fought 15th of May, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 15th of May, 2016 & # 41
  • Trentino & # 40battle fought 15th of May, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 15th of May, 2016 & # 41
  • Jutland & # 40battle fought 31st of May, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 31st of May, 2016 & # 41
  • Lutsk (battle fought 4th of June, 1916, therefore the corresponding tournament should have launched 4th of June, 2016)
  • Khanaquin & # 40battle fought 4th of June, 1916, therefore the corresponding )
  • First Day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916
  • Bazentin Ridge, July 14th, 1916
  • Delville Wood, July 15th, 1916
  • Battle of Pozières, July 23rd, 1916
  • Romani, August 3rd, 1916
  • Sixth Battle of the Isonzo, August 6th, 1916
  • Gorizia, August 6th, 1916
  • Battle of Guillemont, Sept 3rd
  • Seventh Battle of the Isonzo, Sept 14th
  • Battle of Flers-Courcelette, Sept 15th
  • Eighth Isonzo, October 8th, 1916
  • Ninth Isonzo, November 1st
  • Maghdaba, December 14th
  • Second Kut, Dec. 15th
  • Opening 1917, the small but exciting Battle of Khadairi Bend, January 9th, 1917
  • Battle of Nahr-al-Kalek, February 26th, 1917
  • Fall of Baghdad, March 11th, 1917
  • Samarrah, March 13th
  • Fallujah, March 19th
  • Jebel Hamrin, March 25
  • First Gaza, March 26h

I've crossed out the ones I've seen started recently. Am I correct in the updated list? Has anyone done something for Lutsk? I'm going to give it a try. I think.

Yup, that's the correct list.

I had intended to do Lutsk, but I haven't gotten around to it, so by all means go ahead.


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Sun Jun 25, 2017 4:00 pm

I've decided to try my hand for at least one of these. lets see how it goes and take it from there


The Battle of Lutsk

While the Battle of Lutsk was relatively short (June 4th to 6th, 1916), it was the opening attack of the Brusilov Offensive (pic of Alexei Brusilov) which became known as the Russian Empire's greatest feat during WWI. It was the worst loss for Austro-Hungarian forces.

On the night of June 4th, the Russians started with a barrage of artillery against the Austro-Hungarian Fourth Army. It was so intense that it broke more than 50 gaps in the barbed wire defenses.

Those defending Lutsk fled in panic or surrendered without resistance. Although they fought back briefly, the overwhelming Russian Infantry pressed forward.

In just two days, 130,000 Austro-Hungarian forces were lost. This forced Austria to halt it's attacks in Italy. It also brought Romania into the war. From this point onwards, the Brusilov Offensive would move ahead in force for the next 4 months.

Round 1: Russian forces pounded gaps in the barbed wire. Random Draw, 5 games, 24 move on, Games: 6 Players, Terminator, Escalating, No Fog. Map - Trench Warfare

Round 2: The defenders fled in panic or surrendered without resistance. 24 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 16 move on, Games: 8 Players, Terminator, Escalating, Fog. Maps - Middle Ages, Classic Cities: Pot Mosbi

Round 3: With overwhelming numbers the Russians pressed the attack. 16 start, Random Draw, 9 games, 8 move on, Games: 4 Players, Terminator, Escalating, Fog. Maps Austro-Hungarian Empire, WWII Eastern Front, Soviet Union

Round 4: A change of direction for many nations. 8 start, Score Resets, Random draw, 8 games, 8 Players, Terminator, Escalating, Fog. Maps Germany, Italy, Orient Express 1883, Europe 1914


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by iAmCaffeine on Sun Jun 25, 2017 4:04 pm


iAmCaffeine Posts: 11045 Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 5:38 pm

Re: The Great War

by djelebert on Mon Jun 26, 2017 9:29 am


djelebert Posts: 898 Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 2:52 am Location: DTC

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Tue Jun 27, 2017 3:59 pm

What do you think Duke? If there are any edits needed, let me know!


The First Day of the Battle of the Somme was some of the worst losses for the British Empire. There were several nations involved in the battle, including the Newfoundland Regiment, who were with the 88th Brigade of the 29th Division.

Of all the battles that the Newfoundland Regiment fought during the First World War, none was as devastating or as defining as the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The Regiment's tragic advance at Beaumont Hamel on the morning of July 1, 1916 became an enduring symbol of its value and of its terrible wartime sacrifices. The events of that day were forever seared into the cultural memory of the Newfoundland and Labrador people.

The Newfoundland Regiment was stationed in trenches near the French village of Beaumont Hamel, which lay behind German lines. It was a strategically difficult position. The German front lines were about 300 to 500 meters away, down a grassy slope and heavily guarded by barbed wire entanglements. The German 119th Reserve Regiment, tough and experienced, had turned the natural defenses of a deep Y-shaped ravine into one of the strongest positions on the entire Somme front. The Newfoundland Regiment's assignment (along with the rest of the 88th Brigade) was to seize control of the German trenches near the village of Beaumont Hamel. The Regiment would be part of a third wave of attackers to leave Allied trenches.

As the first wave of Allied troops left their trenches at 7:30, they were greeted by a devastating barrage of enemy artillery and machine gun fire. It was far stronger than anyone had anticipated. Most men were killed or wounded in minutes. A second wave of troops left their trenches soon after and met with the same fate. The Newfoundland Regiment was still in its trenches, awaiting orders to go over the top as part of a third wave of attack.

The men left their trenches at 9:15 a.m., with orders to seize the first and second lines of enemy trenches. But as they moved down the exposed slope towards No Man's Land, no friendly fire covered their advance. Instead, German cross-fire cut across the advancing columns of men, killing or wounding most of them before they even reached No Man's Land.

The attack was a devastating failure. In a single morning, almost 20,000 British troops died, and another 37,000 were wounded. The Newfoundland Regiment had been almost wiped out. When roll call was taken, only 68 men answered their names - 324 were killed, or missing and presumed dead, and 386 were wounded.


Above text and images are excerpts from Heritage Newfoundland & Labrador http://www.heritage.nf.ca/ website

Round 1. Germany had marched through Belgium and into northern France. 24 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 24 move on. Games: 8 players, Standard, Flat rate, random fog, adj forts. Maps - France, BeNeLux, Germany

Round 2. Newfoundland Regiment is with the 88th Brigade of the 29th Division. 24 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 18 move on. Games: 4 player, Terminator, No spoils, no fog, unlimited forts. Maps - Wales, Scotland, England

Round 3. Many soldiers sent letters home in the days before the battle. 18 start, random Draw, 6 games, 14 move on. Games: 9 player, Terminator, Esc, no fog, chained forts. Maps - Canada, North America, Gulf of St. Lawrence

Round 4. Allied trenches stretched along one side and Germans along the other. Score Resets. 14 start, random draw, 6 games, 14 move on. Games: 7 player, Standard, No spoils, random fog, adj forts. Maps - Trench Warfare, Siege

Round 5. This was a death trap for our boys. 14 start, random draw, 8 games, 8 move on. Games 7 player, Standard, random Nuclear / Zombie spoils, random fog, chained forts. Maps - Island of Doom, Madness.

Round 6. Beaumont Hamel plunged Newfoundland and Labrador into a period of mourning. 8 start, 8 games. Games 8 player, Standard, random flat rate / esc / no spoils, Fog, chained forts. Maps - France 2.1, Unification Germany, British Isles, Gulf of St. Lawrence.


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by ConfederateSS on Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:34 am


ConfederateSS Posts: 1984 Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:50 pm Location: THE CONFEDERATE STATES of AMERICA and THE OLD WEST! 2

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:45 am

Love your take on these - glad to be able to help move them forward.

I’ve got one nearly done for the Battle of Bazentin Ridge for now - so if you and Duk and Xroads are good with that, then I’ll post it here in the next few days. If you are working forward to Gorizia, I could pick up with Guillemont and / or beyond.

I too don’t want to step on anyone. and Duk did say okay to Lutsk.

So maybe we post here for future reference?

Lutsk - posted - morleyjoe
Khanaquin - posted - ConfederateSS
First Day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916 -posted - morleyjoe
Bazentin Ridge, July 14th, 1916 - started - morleyjoe
Delville Wood, July 15th, 1916 - started - ConfederateSS
Battle of Pozières, July 23rd, 1916 - started - ConfederateSS
Romani, August 3rd, 1916 - started - ConfederateSS
Sixth Battle of the Isonzo, August 6th, 1916 - started - ConfederateSS
Gorizia, August 6th, 1916 - started - ConfederateSS

Battle of Guillemont, Sept 3rd
Seventh Battle of the Isonzo, Sept 14th
Battle of Flers-Courcelette, Sept 15th
Eighth Isonzo, October 8th, 1916
Ninth Isonzo, November 1st
Maghdaba, December 14th
Second Kut, Dec. 15th
Opening 1917, the small but exciting Battle of Khadairi Bend, January 9th, 1917
Battle of Nahr-al-Kalek, February 26th, 1917
Fall of Baghdad, March 11th, 1917
Samarrah, March 13th
Fallujah, March 19th
Jebel Hamrin, March 25
First Gaza, March 26h

Duk posts here for more battles.


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by Mad777 on Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:23 pm


Mad777 Community Coordinator
Posts: 8792 Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 9:21 am

Re: The Great War

by Dukasaur on Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:45 pm

It's really not a problem that we have two different Battles of the Somme. We can run both.

You guys are doing great! I'll try to get the thread tidied up a bit this weekend.


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Tenth quarter archive

by Dukasaur on Sun Jul 02, 2017 11:22 pm


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Eleventh quarter archive

by Dukasaur on Sun Jul 02, 2017 11:25 pm

Eleventh Quarter Archive (April to June of 2017)


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:41 pm

Installment # 3 is below, as noted previously was in draft, now completed.

Lutsk - posted - morleyjoe
Khanaquin - posted - ConfederateSS
First Day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916 - posted - morleyjoe
Bazentin Ridge, July 14th, 1916 - posted - morleyjoe
Delville Wood, July 15th, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Battle of Pozières, July 23rd, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Romani, August 3rd, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Sixth Battle of the Isonzo, August 6th, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Gorizia, August 6th, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Battle of Guillemont, Sept 3rd - draft started - morleyjoe

Seventh Battle of the Isonzo, Sept 14th
Battle of Flers-Courcelette, Sept 15th
Eighth Isonzo, October 8th, 1916
Ninth Isonzo, November 1st
Maghdaba, December 14th
Second Kut, Dec. 15th
Opening 1917, the small but exciting Battle of Khadairi Bend, January 9th, 1917
Battle of Nahr-al-Kalek, February 26th, 1917
Fall of Baghdad, March 11th, 1917
Samarrah, March 13th
Fallujah, March 19th
Jebel Hamrin, March 25
First Gaza, March 26h


Battle of Bazentin Ridge July 14-17, 1916

The disastrous opening of the Battle of the Somme on is still remembered as the bloodiest day in British military history, but it was merely the beginning of five months of horror that resulted in 1.3 million casualties on both sides, including 310,486 killed and missing. The lion’s share of these were inflicted in a series of incremental Allied offensives throughout the summer and fall of 1916, as the British and French pushed forward again and again in search of an ever-elusive breakthrough.

The second big push fell just two weeks after the first assault, during the Battle of Bazentin Ridge from July 14-17, when the British scored a rare victory but then failed to exploit it, giving the Germans a chance to regroup and dig in again. - by now a frustratingly familiar result on those rare occasions when either side scored a success.

In the early morning of July 14, the shelling culminated in a five-minute “hurricane” bombardment. By 10 a.m. on July 14, the British 3rd and 7th Divisions had torn a hole in the German defenses, clearing the way for an advance into the High Wood north of Bazentin le Petit, but the divisional commanders were under orders to hold their positions and could not call on reinforcements, which were being held in reserve in case of potential German counterattacks elsewhere.

Meanwhile the British attack didn’t succeed everywhere: the 9th Division in particular, attacking the German lines near the village of Longueval, suffered very heavy casualties as it tried to push the Germans out of Delville Wood. South African troops continued to battle for Longueval and Delville Wood from July 14 to July 17, but the planned cavalry attack was called off after an abortive advance by the Indian cavalry division revealed the Germans were still well entrenched.

By July 17, the arrival of growing numbers of German reinforcements finally spelled the end of the fleeting British success at Bazentin Ridge.


Above text and image are excerpts from Mental Floss http://mentalfloss.com/
Read all the details at http://mentalfloss.com/article/83219/ww. ntin-ridge

Round 1. The British scored a rare victory but then failed to exploit it. 25 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 25 move on. Games: 1 point per game, 5 players, Standard, Flat rate, fog, random adjacent / chained / parachute forts. Maps - British Isles, Classic Cities: London, England

Round 2. Douglas Haig ordered the Fourth Army to push ahead on the southern front. 25 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 20 move on. Games: 2 points per game, 5 players, Standard, Esc, random fog, unlimited forts. Maps - WWII Western Front, WWII Eastern Front, Europe

Round 3. Indian cavalry hindered by shell holes and debris strewn across the battlefield. 20 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 15 move on. Games: 3 points per game, 5 players, Standard, Flat rate, no fog, adj forts. Maps - Indian Empire, South Africa 1885, Dark Continent

Round 4. The situation remained a stalemate - albeit an extremely violent one. 15 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 5 move on. Games: 4 points per game, 5 players, Terminator, random Esc / flat / no spoils, fog, chained forts. Maps - Halloween Hollows, Salem's Switch, Monsters

Round 5. German reinforcements finally spelled the end of the fleeting British success. 5 start, Random Draw, 9 games. Games: 5 points per game, 5 players, Standard, Esc, no fog, unlimited forts. Maps - Germany, Holy Roman Empire, France 1789


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by Dukasaur on Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:45 pm

Magnificent work, both of you.

This weekend I was tied up with getting the USA Supertournament off the ground, but now that it’s almost done I can turn my attention back to this. Will be coding Khanaquin within a few days, and then pounding away at the rest of it. Thank you very much for all your great entries!


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Re: The Great War

by ConfederateSS on Wed Jul 05, 2017 9:44 pm


ConfederateSS Posts: 1984 Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:50 pm Location: THE CONFEDERATE STATES of AMERICA and THE OLD WEST! 2

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:43 pm

Battle of Guillemont, September 3rd to 6th, 1916

Progress on this eastern flank of the British line was essential if the French and British were to cooperate properly north of the Somme. By the start of September the capture of Guillemont was becoming more urgent, as the plans for an attack north toward Flers and Courcelette began to take shape.

The successful attack on Guillemont was made by XIV corps, and was led by the 20th Division, with the 5th Division to their right. Their target was Leuze Wood, 1,500 yards beyond the village, on a ridge overlooking the village of Combles.

The southern part of the attack on 3 September suffered the most heavily. There the 13th Brigade had been relying on the French for a final bombardment of their objective, Falfemont Farm, but the French became stuck in Combles Ravine, and were unable to make and progress. The leading waves of the first battalion to attack were wiped out by German fire. To their left the 95th Brigade (5th Division) captured its first three objectives, and reached a line east of Guillemont.

The 20th Division attack on Guillemont began from a series of trenches very close to the German front line. The village itself had been destroyed by repeated artillery bombardments, but underneath it was a maze of German strong points. Despite this the 20th Division attack succeeded, captured its three objectives and reached the Ginchy-Wedge Wood road, east of Guillemont. Elsewhere British attacks on Ginchy and further west around the front met with little or no success on 3 September.

The advance east of Guillemont continued over the next three days. By the end of 6 September the British had reached their target line, around Leuze Wood, and were ready to turn north to deal with Ginchy. Everything would soon be in place for the next big attack, at Flers-Courcelette.

Above text is from article: Rickard, J (21 September 2007), Battle of Guillemont, 3-6 September 1916, http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/ba. emont.html


Image is from guernseydonkey.com, showing the 6th Royal Irish regiment, as they were heading back for a rest after taking Guillemont

Round 1. The 6th Royal Irish regiment attack the village of Guillemont as part of the middle stages of the battle of Somme. 30 start, Random Draw, 8 games, 30 move on. Games: 6 players, Standard, Manual deployment, Flat rate, fog, chained forts. Maps - Ireland, Celtic Nations

Round 2. German defensive fire pinned down the French 127th Regiment in the ravine. 30 start, Random Draw, 6 games, 24 move on. Games: 6 players, Terminator, Esc, no fog, adjacent forts. Maps - Egypt: Valley Of The Kings, France 1789

Round 3. The 95th Brigade (5th Division) captured its first three objectives. 24 start, Random Draw, 4 games, 16 move on. Games: 8 players, Standard, Flat rate, fog, parachute. Maps - Operation Drug Lord, All Your Base Are Belong To Us

Round 4. The village itself had been destroyed, but underneath it was a maze of German strong points. 16 start, Random Draw, 4 games, 8 move on. Games: 8 players, Terminator, random Flat rate / Esc / Nuke, no fog, chained forts. Maps - Draknor - Level 1, Stalingrad

Round 5. The British had reached their target line, and were ready to turn north. 8 start, Score resets, 9 games. Games: 8 players, Assassin, random Flat rate / Esc, strong parachute. Maps - North America, Northwest Passage, First Nations North America


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Tue Jul 11, 2017 3:46 pm

Lutsk - posted - morleyjoe
Khanaquin - posted - ConfederateSS
First Day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916 - posted - morleyjoe
Bazentin Ridge, July 14th, 1916 - posted - morleyjoe
Delville Wood, July 15th, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Battle of Pozières, July 23rd, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Romani, August 3rd, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Sixth Battle of the Isonzo, August 6th, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Gorizia, August 6th, 1916 - draft started - ConfederateSS
Battle of Guillemont, Sept 3rd - posted - morleyjoe
Seventh Battle of the Isonzo, Sept 14th - posted - morleyjoe

Battle of Flers-Courcelette, Sept 15th
Eighth Isonzo, October 8th, 1916
Ninth Isonzo, November 1st
Maghdaba, December 14th
Second Kut, Dec. 15th
Opening 1917, the small but exciting Battle of Khadairi Bend, January 9th, 1917
Battle of Nahr-al-Kalek, February 26th, 1917
Fall of Baghdad, March 11th, 1917
Samarrah, March 13th
Fallujah, March 19th
Jebel Hamrin, March 25
First Gaza, March 26h

If anyone else is thinking of posting an event, please make a note of it for others. I plan to do more, as I've had fun with it so far.


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by Dukasaur on Sun Jul 23, 2017 7:26 pm


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Re: The Great War

by BUDMAN on Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:16 am


BUDMAN Posts: 22 Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:21 pm Location: McHenry Illinois

Re: The Great War

by Dukasaur on Fri Aug 04, 2017 2:12 pm

Yes, I'll get at least one done this month.


Dukasaur Community Team
Posts: 24640 Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:49 pm Location: Beautiful Niagara 2 2

Re: The Great War

by morleyjoe on Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:48 pm

Freemium friendly Seventh Battle of the Isonzo , September 14-17, 1916

Since it joined the war Italy has launched a series of offensives along the Isonzo. Most of these have been bloody failures.

But the last offensive, the sixth, saw the Austro-Hungarian pushed back as the Italians surged forward and captured Gorizia. That success was unexpected. The Italians were hoping only for minor gains and were unprepared to exploit their breakthrough, allowing the Austro-Hungarians to fall back and establish new defensive lines.

In preparation for another attack Italian artillery has been blasting the enemy for the last few days. However the bombardment’s effectiveness has been diminished by poor weather, which had made it difficult to observe the enemy lines. The Austro-Hungarians have also carefully camouflaged their positions, so the Italians are more or less firing their guns blind and hoping for the best.

Now Cadorna sends the infantry forward. The Austro-Hungarians are being pressed by the Russians in Galicia and the Romanians in Transylvania, so he hopes that this Italian assault will be the hammer blow that breaks their resistance.

Unfortunately the battle goes more like the first five Isonzo battles than the sixth. Italian troops emerge from their trenches and begin to move forward, adopting close-order formations like something from the Napoleonic Wars. Then the Austro-Hungarians open up with their hidden field artillery and machine-guns, cutting great holes in the Italian columns. To one Austro-Hungarian officer the Italian attack looks like “an attempt at mass suicide”.

Gains are minimal and often lost to Austro-Hungarian counter-attacks. The sixth battle is revealed as an aberration as the Isonzo returns to its normal pattern of bloody stalemate.


Image is from same article listed above

Round 1. Italy launched a series of offensives along the Isonzo. 32 start, Random Draw, 1 game, 32 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (2), Auto deployment, Flat Rate, no fog, chained forts. Map - Italy

Round 2. The sixth battle saw the Austro-Hungarian pushed back. 32 start, Random Draw, 1 game, 32 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (3), Auto deployment, Escalating, fog, unlimited forts. Map - Austro-Hungarian Empire

Round 3. The Italians were unprepared to exploit their breakthrough. 32 start, Random Draw, 1 game, 16 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (4), Auto deployment, No spoils, fog, parachute forts. Map - Imperium Romanum

Round 4. Artillery blasting the enemy for the last few days. 16 start, Score Resets, Random Draw, 1 game, 16 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (2), Manual deployment, Flat Rate, no fog, chained forts. Map - WWII Western Front

Round 5. Hopes that this Italian assault will be the hammer blow. 16 start, Random Draw, 1 game, 16 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (3), Manual deployment, Escalating Spoils, fog, unlimited forts. Map - Unification Italy

Round 6. Italian troops emerge from their trenches. 16 start, Random Draw, 1 game, 8 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (4), Manual deployment, No spoils, no fog, parachute forts. Map - Trench Warfare

Round 7. Italians adopted close-order formations like the Napoleonic Wars. 8 start, Score resets, Random Draw, 1 game, 4 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (2), Auto deployment, Flat rate, no fog, unlimited forts. Map - Napoleonic Europe

Round 8. Austro-Hungarians cut great holes in the Italian columns. 4 start, Random Draw, 1 game, 2 move on. Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (3), Auto deployment, Escalating Spoils, fog, parachute forts. Map - King Of The Mountains

Round 9. Isonzo returns to its normal pattern of bloody stalemate. 2 start, Random Draw, 1 game, Games: 2 players, Polymorphic (4), Auto deployment, No Spoils, fog, chained forts. Map - Poison Rome


morleyjoe Posts: 1618 Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:42 pm Location: Fenwick Ontario Canada

Re: The Great War

by ConfederateSS on Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:26 am


ConfederateSS Posts: 1984 Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:50 pm Location: THE CONFEDERATE STATES of AMERICA and THE OLD WEST! 2

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